7 Obstacles That Prevent People From Starting Businesses (And How To Overcome Them)

Millions of people dream of becoming entrepreneurs, but they never take that all-important first step. Too many things get in the way of their pursuit of business ownership, or they keep convincing themselves that their dream isn’t realistic. 

If you ever want to move past this phase and found your own business, you need to acknowledge the specific obstacles that are holding you back and work to resolve them. Here are seven of the most common challenges that may be standing between you and your entrepreneurial dreams—and ways you can kick them to the curb. 

1. Financial limitations

Launching a business takes money, and most people don’t have ample cash to throw at a startup. There are several options here. First off, you could begin saving now for the funds to establish your business. If you shop for a better mortgage and reduce your house payments by refinancing, you can sock the savings away in your startup fund. You can trim costs in other areas to put away a few hundred dollars each month or save even more by picking up a side gig.

Barring that, you can secure funding in a variety of ways, such as borrowing from friends and family, crowdfunding, seeking loans and grants or even working with angel investors and venture capitalists. There’s always a way forward. 

2. Inexperience

Becoming a successful entrepreneur typically demands experience; you need to understand your industry and business management in general if you want to earn a living from your venture. When you have limited experience, you may be reluctant to move forward, and understandably so.

You can make up for this, however, by actively seeking the experience you lack. Take an online course to gain a grasp of business management basics. Strive for a leadership position with your current employer so you’ll acquire strategic planning and people management skills. Work with a mentor or shadow an entrepreneur you admire. 

3. No standout idea

You can’t build a business if you don’t have a promising idea for a product or service you can sell. Without a solid business plan, you won’t be able to convince investors or partners to join you—and you won’t even know where to begin. Unfortunately, this is one of the least “fudgeable” obstacles on this list. Without a good idea, you can’t start a business, period.

Luckily, there are ways to stimulate better idea generation, such as talking to a broad range of people, reading entrepreneurial content and taking a more robust approach to brainstorming. Techniques like mind mapping and word banking can get your creative juices flowing. 

4. Current responsibilities

Some people avoid starting a business because of existing responsibilities or constraints on their time. Their current full-time job, their status as a parent or other personal responsibilities hold them back from their entrepreneurial ambitions.

Here the best approach is to determine how much of an impact these responsibilities have and consider ways to delegate or remove them. Could you realistically quit your day job, for example, or hire someone to help with household duties or childcare?  

5. Fear of failure

Lack of confidence is an entrepreneurship killer. It’s true that the failure rate for new businesses is relatively high, with half of new companies failing within five years. To buck those odds, you’ll need a healthy dose of confidence in yourself and your idea. 

The only solution to a fear of failure is to change your mindset. You have to see failure as an opportunity for learning and growth and stop seeing it as the end of the road, an indictment of your abilities or a stain on your character. Reading accounts by successful entrepreneurs will inspire you to see the possibilities rather than focusing only on the risks.  

6. Aversion to stress or hard work

Starting and running a business demands a lot of effort. You’ll likely be putting in long hours and dealing with stressful issues. On top of that, your first few years are apt to be highly inconsistent, with your business only making a profit some of the time. This can wreak havoc on your finances and peace of mind. If you’re not feeling up to this kind of pressure, or if you’re loath to work more than 40 hours a week, entrepreneurship may not be for you.

Again, the only way around this obstacle is to change your attitude. Remember that all this hard work will be in service to yourself, not an employer. While the risks are on you, so are the rewards.

7. Poor timing

One of the most common excuses you’ll hear (or hear yourself saying) is that it’s “just not the right time” to start a business. The truth is, there’s never a truly “right” time—you can always find some reason that today, or this month or this year isn’t ideal for launching your venture. 

But like beginning a diet on a Wednesday or joining a gym in February, the trick is to make your own right time. Microsoft was born during the oil crisis of the 1970s, while Airbnb and Uber were founded in the depths of the Great Recession. Remind yourself that the success of your business will depend not on “the times” but on you.

The Realities of Entrepreneurship

It’s true that anyone can become an entrepreneur with enough grit and persistence. Most entrepreneurs with solid ideas have a good chance of becoming successful if they remain adaptable. But it’s also important to realize that not everyone is cut out for entrepreneurship

If you’re intimidated by the stress, inconsistency and long hours associated with startup life, or if you truly love your day job and you’re afraid to leave, maybe business ownership isn’t right for you. That said, if you feel the pull of entrepreneurship but keep making excuses to avoid getting started, you owe it to yourself to challenge those excuses and try to move past them.

This article was written by Serenity Gibbons and published on Forbes.com.

Gain Personal Momentum Coming Out of the Pandemic

Part 1: Better Habits for a Healthier Mind

Since the Covid-19 outbreak we’ve all had to make adjustments so that we could cover our basic needs, care for our loved ones, and remain productive during quarantine. No matter how well you’ve adapted to these extraordinary circumstances, there’s probably a part of you that feels like you’ve been just trying to get through the next day. But it’s important that we create some personal momentum as life returns to normal, so we can hit the ground running.

And, to your credit, you have!

But as the country begins to reopen, it’s time to stop “getting by” and start approaching our lives and work with the same vigor we had before the pandemic. Regaining our old momentum isn’t going to be as easy as flipping a switch. So we asked some leading experts on behavior and peak performance what mental strategies they would recommend to help us start building personal momentum as we approach, hopefully, the end of quarantine life.

  1. Live in your “Present Box.”

Licensed clinical psychologist Dr. Beth Kurland says that evolution instilled a “wandering mind” in humans as a survival mechanism. We’re never totally in the present because our survival instinct is constantly reminding us of things we overcame in the past and alerting us to potential future dangers. Dr. Kurland says, “In this pandemic of uncertainty, these kinds of mental ruminations can really increase a lot of the anxiety that people are experiencing.”

The more that we focus on the here and now, the less anxious we are going to be, and the more motivated we will feel to tackle immediate problems. To help achieve this mental shift, Dr. Kurland recommends drawing two large boxes on a sheet of paper. Label one “The Present,” and label the other “What If?” Then, write the things that are occupying your mind in the appropriate box. According to Dr. Kurland, separating what’s happening right now from what could happen helps us “to really think about what is in our sphere of influence, what we have personal agency and control over.”

Yes, eventually, you might have to move some of those “What Ifs?” into your “Present” box. But for the moment, try to imagine putting a lid on your “What Ifs?” and structure your time around what you need to do – and can do – today.

  1. More Teflon, less Velcro.

Psychologist Rick Hanson says, “The mind is like Velcro for negative experiences and Teflon for positive ones.” The anxiety and worry we’re all experiencing during quarantine only enhances our tendency to dwell on the negative and overlook the many good things we have in our lives.

Dr. Kurland believes that an added benefit of her Two Boxes exercise is that the more present we are, the more likely we are to notice and appreciate the positive. For example, many of us are feeling closer to our extended friends and families thanks to Zoom calls and care packages. Other folks have used the working from home experience to chart new career paths.

However, a Teflon mindset doesn’t mean boxing away some of the real emotional hardships you’ve experienced during the pandemic. Instead, Dr. Kurland encourages us to find a healthy balance between letting our feelings in and not letting them keep us down.

“I think it’s really important to acknowledge and have an opportunity to process those emotions,” Dr. Kurland says. “But try to both hold a space for the grief, the sadness that may be there, and also really find ways to notice the moments where we can really appreciate the positive things that we can take in. The warm glance from a family member or a kind word from a coworker. These kinds of things that really, as we take them in, can help us to get through a difficult day, a difficult moment.”

  1. Separate good stress from bad stress.

“Stress is good to a certain extent,” says Commander David Sears, who served for 20 years in active duty within the United States Special Operations Command as a U.S. Navy SEAL officer. In Commander Sears’ experience, stress can be a catalyst for growth and improvement. Right now stress is instilling good new habits in you, such as wearing a mask when you go shopping or retooling your monthly budget to adjust for changes in your work and living conditions.

But Commander Sears cautions, “You can get overwhelmed by stress and then it starts to become chronic, debilitating and it turns into a sort of pain.” To manage his own stress response, Commander Sears leans on lessons from his military service, including the importance of having a support system around you and finding order in a personal routine.

“It’s Physical Distancing”

“This whole idea of social distancing that we have is wrong,” says Commander Sears. “It’s physical distancing. We still need that social interaction, you need to have those communications. And you have to put in some structure in order to put some sanity into your life. Maybe develop your own schedule in the morning: I’m going to get up, I’m going to work out, I’m still going to put on my pants and get out of my pajamas. I’m going to then go to my first project of the day, then I’m going to go to the second. You might even need to implement a little more structure and discipline in your life in these times so you don’t feel like you’re wandering.”

We understand that transitioning back to living and working outside of your home is going to present its own set of challenges. We hope the expert strategies discussed here will help you approach those challenges from a more positive place. We’re also available for video calls or in-person meetings to discuss how your Life-Centered financial plan can help you build more momentum towards living your best possible life after quarantine.

If you would like to create personal momentum in your personal finances, reach out to us.

Additional Government Resources

How Orangetheory Has Built a Devoted Following in a Crowded Boutique Fitness Market

From left: Jerome Kern, Ellen Latham, and David Long, co-founders of Orangetheory Fitness.
SCOTT MCINTYRE

When Ellen Latham lost her job managing a Miami spa in 2000, she was a single mother to a 9-year-old and terrified she wouldn’t find work. She used her background in physical education to make ends meet, eventually turning her at-home Pilates class into Orangetheory Fitness, a fast-growing exercise brand that in 2018 booked $180 million in revenue. 

Latham founded her Boca Raton, Florida-based company in 2010 with franchise-industry veterans David Long and Jerome Kern. They started with the premise that customers might experience better results if they were more attuned with how their individual bodies respond to exercise. The company achieves this with the help of wearables that track exercisers’ heart rates, inclines, speeds, and calories burned. The “orange” in Orangetheory refers to the “orange zone”–that is, a period of time in which a person’s heart beats at optimal efficiency. Ideally, customers should aim to spend at least 12 minutes in this zone during each 60-minute coach-led fitness class.

After hitting this point, a person’s body will work harder later to recover oxygen lost during exercise, which can accelerate the metabolism and help burn calories, says Latham. People don’t keep coming back to the gym for its orange motif, she says. “They are coming back because they get results from their workouts.”

And that’s led to significant growth for the boutique fitness brand. Indeed, in the last year, Orangetheory added 219 franchise locations and one corporate-owned studio across the U.S and India, bringing the company’s global tally to more than 1,300 franchise locations. It has also built a cult-like following among members–with some devotees getting tattoos of the company’s logo, notes Latham. Meanwhile, its two-year revenue totals shot up 341 percent since 2016, helping Orangetheory hit No. 35 on the 2020 Inc. 5000 Series: Florida list, a ranking of the fastest-growing private companies in the state.

While the company can credit much of its past success to helping customers understand their orange zones–and cultivating a community of superfans–its future success has everything to do with being able to deliver a fuller picture of customers’ health.

Part of that strategy rests in Orangetheory’s use of wearables. While the company started out simply strapping heart-rate monitors to people’s chests, in recent years it has begun selling the technology. Though customers can still borrow devices during class time, they can pick between four different versions of proprietary wearable devices. The gadgets cost as much as $129 and may be worn around the chest, wrist, or arm.

While Long says the devices account for just 10 percent of Orangetheory’s sales, the hope is the technology will become more popular with users, as the company builds out its offerings. In December, Orangetheory partnered with Apple to create a wearable that attaches to the Apple Watch, so customers can track a wide range of fitness and wellness data.

“We believed in it so much and it was a big focus of the brand early on,” says Long, Orangetheory’s CEO. “We wanted to build a wearable that was easy to use and helped us pick up massive member engagement.”

The company is also looking into joining the at-home fitness craze by releasing content on wellness topics, such as sleep, nutrition, and recovery guides. That’s a step in the right direction, says Andrea Wroble, a health and wellness analyst with the market research company Mintel–though she thinks Orangetheory could go further by streaming its classes. Home workouts have proved to be a promising way to scale for some companies–and that could deliver dividends for Orangetheory, she says.

Orangetheory’s plan to expand further into fitness tracking is a good one, because it could help the company build a stronger connection with its community, adds Wroble. “It creates a partnership with followers where the company can crowdsource ideas and the community feels seen and heard,” she says.

Still, standing out in the boutique fitness industry, which has exploded in size in recent years, may be tough for Orangetheory. In 2019, the U.S. health and fitness club industry reached an estimated $34.5 billion in revenue, amid different concepts like gyms and class studios, according to Mintel. 

What’s more, at-home fitness incumbents like Peloton and Mirror are already doing a sizable business and gaining widespread traction among users. So elbowing in on that market might be tough.

Latham isn’t deterred. “We’re not trying to create another fad in fitness. We are still appealing to huge masses and getting new clients,” she says.

To that end, Orangetheory continues to grow its physical presence, which should bolster its bottom line. Individual franchises cost between $576,000 and $1.5 million to start, which includes a $59,950 initial fee. The company hopes to reach 2,200 locations worldwide by 2025.

This article was written by Emily Canal and published by Inc.com.

As Kobe Bryant Turns 41, These Insane Work Ethic Stories Reveal Ways He Became Great

Kobe Bryant is one of the best basketball players on the planet. If you were to put a Mount Rushmore of ballers out there, the Los Angeles Lakers’ legend’s face may just be on it, given the fact he won five NBA titles and racked up 33,643 career points — which is good enough for third on the league’s all-time scoring list.

What’s even more impressive is what Bryant has done since retiring from basketball in 2016. In addition to the sports accolades, Kobe’s won an Academy Award for his animated short film “Dear Basketball,” and continues to inspire people with his book, The Mamba Mentality: How I Play. It’s really incredible to see a superstar athlete transition from hoops success to business success so seamlessly.

But, like most successful people out there, Kobe Bryant hasn’t accomplished all that he has by sheer talent alone. Sure, that’s helped, but really separates the basketball icon from other people is his work ethic — which is legendary.

As Bryant turns 41 years old, we look at 41 stories that prove just how insane his passion and desire to be the best really is. So let these serve as motivation for you to roll up your sleeves, push yourself and achieve everything you want to.

Kobe Bryant’s 40-Mile Bike Ride

Bryant told his longtime trainer, Tim Grover, that he wanted to add in bike training to his summer conditioning. Grover researched a trail in Las Vegas, rented three bikes — one for Bryant, one for himself and one for Bryant’s security guard — and on the night before the first day of practice, they each put on headlamps and headed out to the trail and rode.

“We finished up around 2 a.m.” Grover said. “And we were back in the gym working out by 7:30 in the morning.”

Kobe Used To Challenge High School Teammates To One-On-One Games To 100

Talk about exhausting, right? Kobe Bryant didn’t need a quick game to 10, but, instead, used to play a benchwarmer on his high school team in one-one-one in games to 100. As the legend goes, even in Bryant’s worst game, he still won 100-12.

Shaquille O’Neal Says Bryant Used To Practice Without A Basketball To Get In Shape

Shaq wrote in his book: “You’d walk in there and he’d be cutting and grunting and motioning like he was dribbling and shooting — except there was no ball. I thought it was weird, but I’m pretty sure it helped him.”

Kobe Bryant’s Game Day Pushups Were More Intense Than An Earthquake

From ESPN’s Rick Reilly: “Among a dozen other drills, Bryant does suicide push-ups. At the top of the pushup, he launches himself off the mat so hard that both his feet come off the ground and his hands slap his pecs. He does three sets of seven of these. This makes me turn away and whimper softly.”

Bryant’s Always Studied Himself And Teammates (Even During Halftime Of Games)

According to ESPN’s Jackie McMullen in 2010: “He often corrals teammates, fires up the laptop, and shows them precisely how they can carve out easier shots for themselves.”

Kobe Bryant’s Work Ethic Even Impressed Kevin Durant

“We had the day off, but they said we could get some shots up if we wanted, so I decided to head over to the gym with [Oklahoma City teammate] Jeff Green. “Kobe [Bryant] was the only guy on the bus to the gym, and that spoke volumes to me — he’s the best player in the game, yet he’s always willing to come work on his game, so that kind of motivated me and Jeff,” Durant said. “He went by himself, he got a lot of shots up, and by the time he was done you could see he had gotten better over that hour. Like I said, it was a big inspiration to me and Jeff.”

When Kobe Bryant Nearly Led His Team From An Absurd Comeback, Per Tyson Chandler

“The thing that makes him so unstoppable is that he never stops coming. This year we were up in New Orleans by like 12 in the 4th quarter with 5-6 minutes left, and we pretty much had the game in control. And (Kobe) was there on the free throw line and he was like ‘You know I ain’t going to let us lose right?’, and I looked back at him and I was like ‘What!? Man I ain’t letting my team lose!’. And he was like ‘Alright but I just know I ain’t going to let my team lose.’ And I went back at him ‘Well I ain’t going to let my team lose!’

“Right after that, man… he ran off like 15 straight points on us. And I was looking at the scoreboard going ‘Come on, let the time run down’, and I’m like he can’t beat us single-handedly especially after I was just sitting there talking crap back and forth to him.

“We ended up winning the game, but he almost beat us! He almost beat us by himself. But his drive, looking into his eyes, some guys can say ‘Yeah we gonna win the game’.

When Bryant Changed The Work Ethic Of His Team USA Teammates

After training for three weeks together before heading to Beijing, former U.S. Olympic teammate Carlos Boozer noticed the entire roster had adopted Bryant’s routine.

“We all clung to it,” said Boozer, who later played with Bryant as a member of the Lakers in 2014-15 and recently agreed to a deal to play in China. “It soon became our workout, not just his workout.”

When Hall Of Fame Center Hakeem Olajuwon Helped Bryant Perfect His Post Moves

Just a week before training camp began in September 2009, the Olajuwon gave Bryant a two-hour step-by-step lesson on everything from head fakes and ball fakes to spin moves and jab steps.

“It was an honor for me to have the opportunity to work with him, and I want to make him proud of what I’ve learned,” Bryant said. “I have wanted to work with him in the past, but the timing was right this year. I got a chance to work with the greatest post player ever. I’ve always been a student of the game, and he was very patient with me.”

Michael Jordan Compared Kobe Bryant’s Work Ethic To His Own

From Roland Lazenby, author of “Michael Jordan: The Life”, per L.A. Times: “He said Kobe had done that work to deserve the comparison. He says Kobe’s the only one to have done the work.”

During His Rookie Year, Bryant Was Found Getting Shots In… In A Dark Gym

Per Business Insider: “I heard the ball bouncing. No lights were on. Practice was at about 11, it was probably about 9, 9:30. And I go out to the court and I look, and there’s Kobe Bryant. He’s out there shooting in the dark. And I stood there for probably about ten seconds, and I said, ‘This kid is gonna be great.’”

Even With A Cast On His Hand, Bryant Was Still Getting In Work

According to former teammate John Celestand: Celestand was excited, because he thought with Kobe injured, he could beat him to the gym in the morning, particularly because Bryant lived over 30 minutes away from the practice facility.

“Kobe was already in a full sweat with a cast on his right arm and dribbling and shooting with his left.”

Bryant Shot Left-Handed During A Game After Injuring His Right Shoulder

He actually made one of the shots, too, after insisting he return to the game.

Dwyane Wade And Chris Bosh Were Sleeping As Kobe Bryant Was Working Out

Per ESPN: “We’re in Las Vegas and we all come down for team breakfast at the start of the whole training camp,” Bosh said. “And Kobe comes in with ice on his knees and with his trainers and stuff. He’s got sweat drenched through his workout gear. And I’m like, ‘It’s 8 o’clock in the morning, man. Where in the hell is he coming from?’”

Wade added: “Everybody else just woke up… We’re all yawning, and he’s already three hours and a full workout into his day.”

Bryant Was Obsessed With Perfection

According to a piece from Ball is Life, a Team USA trainer said that Kobe Bryant once held a workout from 4:15 a.m. to 11 a.m., refusing to leave the gym until he made 800 shots.

Bryant Would Use Teammates As Guinea Pigs After Practice

Per Sports Illustrated: In 2008, Sports Illustrated reported that Kobe will keep random players after practice so that he can try out new moves on them

Scouts Praised Kobe Bryant For Doing More Than Other NBA Superstars

Per Sports Illustrated: An NBA scout said in 2008, “Allen Iverson loves to play when the lights come on. Kobe loves doing the s— before the lights come on.”

O.J. Mayo Once Confused 3 A.M. For 3 P.M. When Training With Kobe Bryant

Per CBS Sports: In 2007, O.J. Mayo was the top recruit at Bryant’s Kobe Basketball Academy. Mayo asked Kobe to work out with him and Bryant graciously accepted. Kobe said he’d pick him up at three. After Bryant failed to show up, Mayo asked Kobe what happened. “Three in the morning,” Kobe replied. “Not three in the afternoon.”

Bryant Stuck To A Strict Diet To Maintain His Advantage And Physique

He eliminated sugar and pizza and only eats lean meat.

He told ESPN: “There aren’t really any supplements that I’m taking from that perspective. What I’ve done really is just train really hard and watch my diet. I think that’s the thing that catches guys most. They don’t do self assessing.”

He Wasn’t Going To Cut Corners, Even When It Came To Telling His Own Story

Per Business Insider, Kobe Bryant once trashed a documentary about himself and started from scratch after being unsatisfied with how the original one turned out.

Kobe Bryant Will Cold-Call Entrepreneurs And Successful Business People To Get Advice

Per Bloomberg: “I’ll just cold call people and pick their brain about stuff. Some of the questions that I’ll ask will seem really, really simple and stupid, quite honestly, for them. But if I don’t know, I don’t know. You have to ask. I’ll just do that. I’ll just ask questions and I want to know more about how they build their businesses and how they run their companies and how they see the world.”

Billionaire Investor Chris Sacca Said Bryant Studied Hard AF About Investing

Per Bill Simmons’ Podcast: “For the next few months my phone never stops buzzing in the middle of the night. It’s Kobe, reading this article, checking out this tweet, following this guy, diving into this Ted Talk, diving into the Y Combinator Demo Day stuff. And I’m getting these texts, literally two or three in the morning, and my wife is like, ‘Are you having an affair with Kobe Bryant? What is happening here?’”

Kobe Bryant Goes Above And Beyond Showcasing His Passion In Everything He Does

Per ESPN: “We are obsessive,” Bryant said. “We wouldn’t want to be doing anything other than what we are doing. That’s where obsession comes in — when you care about something 24 hours a day.

When Bryant Taught Jay Williams What It Really Meant To Put In Work

During a regular season game against the Championship Lakers, Jay took the court for practice four hours before the game against Lakers, but he was shocked to see Kobe practicing already. Williams practiced for an hour and after he was done practicing, he sat down, but he still heard the ball bouncing.

Jay was shocked, because Kobe had been in a dead sweat when he got there for practice, and he was still going after Jay got done. He also added that Kobe was not practicing lazy or nonchalant moves, but full-on game moves.

Kobe scored 40 points that night and torched Jay and the Bulls. Williams therefore decided to go ask Bryant why he was in the gym for so long. When Jay finally asked him, the Black Mamba replied, “Because I saw you come in and I wanted you to know that it doesn’t matter how hard you work, I am willing to work harder than you. You inspire me to be better.”

Jay also revealed that it was the first time that he saw this level of competitiveness and he told himself, “I need to start doing more.”

Shaquille O’Neal Describes Bryant As A ‘Scientific Dawg’

Per L.A. Times: “Kobe is a scientific dawg,” O’Neal wrote. “He works out every day, practices every day. Most of the other stars are just dawgs, not scientific dawgs. Kobe will always have the edge because of his range and killer instinct. LeBron has the killer instinct, but he can’t shoot like Kobe can.”

Jamal Crawford Heard Kobe Bryant Once Practiced Just One Shot For An Hour Straight

Per The Players’ Tribune: “I heard one time in a workout that he practiced a shot for an hour. The same shot. For one hour. And it wasn’t like a three-pointer, it was a little shot in the mid-range area. Do you know how tedious that is? Do you know how locked in you have to be to do one shot for an hour? To trick your mind that way? That’s unbelievable.”

Bryant’s Former Teammate, Tony Gaffney, Detailed Kobe’s Routine

Per Basketball Insiders: If the Lakers had a 10:30 a.m. practice, Bryant would be in the gym at 6:00, take his daughters Natalia and Gianna to school at 8:00, then come back around 9:00 to shoot some more.

“No one would have any idea that he’s been in the gym working for three-to-four hours,” Gaffney said

Kobe Bryant Would Count The 400 Shots He Put Up During Practice

Per Sports Illustrated: Later, as he toweled down and sat for an interview, he was asked if he had a certain shooting routine.

“Absolutely,” he said. “I go from spot to spot. Today I quit when I made 400 shots.”

How do you know?

“What do you mean, How do I know? I know because I counted them.”

Former Team USA Teammate Carlos Boozer Described Bryant’s Unmatched Dedication

“You know what it was for me? And me and him are good friends, but I hadn’t really trained with him — is how hard he works. We saw his dedication to the game. He would get in the gym, lift weights, he would go over to the gym, get shots up before practice, go through the whole practice, and that was his routine every day. He’s not great by accident is my point. He puts the work in. And I think what I learned about Kobe is he’s so hungry to be good, he puts the work in. I just think his hunger and his determination is what I was most impressed with.”

Syracuse And Former Team USA Coach Jim Boeheim Described Bryant As The ‘Hardest-Working Player’ He’s Ever Been Around

“Kobe, from day one, is just the hardest-working player I’ve ever been around. He just does an unbelievable job. He came in, he worked out before practice and practiced harder than anybody and then worked out afterwards and continued the whole trip. The first trip we are qualifying and then the Olympics themselves. He’s just an unbelievable competitor and in practice goes 100 percent every day in practice and that brings everybody else up to that same level. He was a huge part of us being ready in the Olympics to be able to win.”

Former NBA All-Star Gary Payton Recounts Kobe Bryant’s High Expectations For Himself

Per Phil Star: “Kobe was so young and so immature in some ways, but I can tell you this: everything Kobe is doing now, he told me all the way back then he was going to do it. We were sitting on the bus once and he told me, ‘I’m going to be the number one scorer for the Lakers, I’m going to win five or six championships, and I’m going to be the best player in the game.’

“I was like, ‘Okay, whatever.’ Then he looked me right in the eye and said, ‘I’m going to be the Will Smith of the NBA.’”

Former Teammate Laron Profit Couldn’t Believe Bryant’s Determination In A 3-On-3 Game

Per StationCaster: “We were playing a pick-up game before the season started, we were playing 3-on-3, and it was game point.

“Kobe had the ball and it came off, Kwame knocked the ball away from him. Again [this was] a pick-up game, September, nothing on the line. And the ball rolled to half court.

“Kobe then ran to half-court, dived under Kwame’s legs with the ball for about 10 feet, picked the ball up, came back down, made some incredible move, then hit the game-winning shot to end the pick-up game.

“I walked off the court, and I called my mom, and I said, “I think I’ve just seen the second best player ever [behind Jordan].”

How Kobe Bryant Is ‘An Alien’ Because Of The Things He Does

Per Complex: Stu Lantz said, “​I tease him all the time, about not being from this planet. I call him a semi-alien. Because some of the things he does, the way he prepares, the way he can play through pain. It’s not usual. He hurt his shoulder in Minnesota and they told him he was going to be out like 6 weeks. I think he was out like a week. That’s not human.”​

Bryant’s Unwillingness To Ever Give Up… Even If It’s A Ping-Pong Game

Per Complex: Mike Trudell said, “Inside this room there’s a Ping-Pong table and some of us are playing, and I grew up with a Ping-Pong table, so I’m pretty good.

“At some point, Kobe makes a comment about one of the players I had just beaten. So I said, ‘Kobe if you want to, I’m happy to give some to you next.’ So, we play the first game and you can tell he can play, but he’s not a super experienced Ping-Pong player, so I sense a couple weaknesses and beat him rather handedly the first game. He is talking a bit of shit, mostly just calling me a MF-er.

“But, the reason I’m telling this story is not as a humble brag but because during the entire game, he was literally watching every point and learning as the game is going on. So, we get done with the game, and he wants to go again. Now, I beat him again the second time, but he got much closer.

“Within 5 minutes, he was taking the Ping-Pong game so seriously, and I thought, this is why he’s so great at basketball. I’ve never competed against anybody in anything, and I played a D1 sport, that felt as intense as that Ping-Pong game.”​

The Time Bryant Went From Drinking Beer To Working Out Within A Few Hours… And Winning A Championship Later That Day

Per Complex: Arash Markazi said, “2009 NBA Finals in Orlando, going into the clinching game, Game 5. I was covering for Sports Illustrated at the time and they put me up at the team hotel. I had been out with some other reporters, and I came back to the hotel and saw Kobe Bryant in the hotel lobby bar at 2 a.m., sipping on a Corona, talking to his friends, enjoying himself.

“I went back up to my hotel room, but couldn’t really sleep that night, so I took a walk around the hotel around 4 or 5 in the morning, and I see Kobe leaving the hotel gym in a full sweat, and the sun wasn’t even out yet. I had heard all these stories about Kobe’s insane training, but you never know if those are real or hyperbole. Then I had that experience. They clinched the next day.”​

Kobe Bryant Taught Former Teammate Luke Walton About Showing Up Hungover On His Watch

Per Silver Screen And Roll: Walton said, “I probably had too much to drink the night before,” Walton recalled. “So I came in, I was a rookie, I felt good, and they could smell some alcohol on me, and Kobe informed the rest of the team that nobody was allowed to help me on defense, and that I had to guard him the entire practice.

“And I was laughing at first, like ‘oh, this is funny,’ Walton continued. “But in Kobe’s mind, in his eyes, he was like ‘no, I see and smell weakness, I’m going to destroy you today.’ He taught me a lesson (laughing), he taught me a lesson. He probably scored 70-something in practice that day, and I’m begging for help, but none of my teammates would help. His killer instinct, and his work ethic will stick with me forever.”

Hearing Kobe’s Own Words On Greatness Shows A Lot About Him

“If you really want to be great at something, you have to truly care about it,” writes Bryant. “If you want to be great in a particular area, you have to obsess over it. A lot of people say they want to be great but are not willing to make the sacrifices necessary to achieve greatness.”

Bryant Followed A ‘666’ Workout Plan

The numbers represent Kobe Bryant’s wild daily workout plan, which consisted of doing six hours a day, six days a week for six months in the offseason. The six hours of training consists of two hours of running, two hours of basketball and two hours of weightlifting.

Bryant Even Demanded His Nike Shoes Gave Him A Small Advantage

Per Sports Illustrated: He had Nike shave a few millimeters off the bottom of his shoes in 2008 to get “a hundredth of a second better reaction time.”

Even In High School, Bryant Was Putting In Work That Showed His Greatness

According to a Sports Illustrated piece, Kobe Bryant used to practice at five in the morning while in high school, ending his workout at 7 a.m. because school started shortly after.

Kobe Bryant Sums Up His Greatness With How He Wants To Be Remembered

Per Yahoo!: “To think of me as a person that’s overachieved, that would mean a lot to me. That means I put a lot of work in and squeezed every ounce of juice out of this orange that I could.”

This is an article from: https://shutupnhustle.com/2019/08/23/kobe-bryant-work-ethic-stories/

Will A Vacation Home Provide a Good Return on Life?

How do you define Return on Life?


A vacation home can provide years of enjoyment and fond memories for multiple generations of your family. They can also create an extra layer of headaches and expenses that prove more trouble than they’re worth.

Here are 4 reasons to think twice before buying a vacation home, even if doing so won’t break the bank:

Full-time bills for part-time enjoyment.

Most workers receive around two weeks of vacation time from their employers. Self-employed “gig economy” workers or small business owners might manage to carve out a few extra days. Or, they might be so busy running their businesses that even a week of vacation time is a stretch.

Regardless, the bills associated with your second home are going to be there 52 weeks of the year: mortgage payments, electricity, basic upkeep, etc. Are you going to spend enough time at your vacation property to justify those costs?

“Landlord” is a job.

Many folks plan to offset the expense of a vacation home by renting it when they’re not using it. This can be an effective way to earn some extra money and make your mortgage payments without stressing your finances.

But when you rent out a property you own, you’re taking on a new job: landlord. That means vetting potential renters and dealing with any unruly folks who slip through your screening process. That means more wear-and-tear on the house, appliances, and furniture. That means repairs. That means complicated insurance and tax issues.

And all that means more work while you’re still working.

Maybe taking on that job appeals to you, especially if you’re retired and enjoy doing handiwork. But if you don’t want to add “landlord” to your resume, don’t use renting your vacation home to justify the purchase.

Visit more, travel less.

Buying something new is exciting, especially when it’s a big-ticket purchase like a vehicle or home. But that excitement can be surprisingly fleeting. Take your new sports car around the block a few times, and it’s suddenly just your car. Watch a few movies in your fancy home theatre, and suddenly it’s just your TV.

A vacation home could be an exception to that rule, especially if it becomes a focal point for family gatherings. In that case, what you’re really buying isn’t a home: it’s an experience of time shared with loved ones. The same holds true if your vacation home is near activities you and your spouse both enjoy, like a cluster of great golf courses or a vibrant restaurant scene.

But if your vacation home is just a nice house, that “getaway” feeling is going to become just another part of your regular routine. Vacationing will start to feel like visiting, or worse, like walking into another set of rooms in your house. When vacation time rolls around, it’s going to be hard to justify spending additional money on “bucket list” travel when you know your second house is just sitting there, racking up mortgage interest, waiting for you to replace the leaky water heater.

Retire TO, not FROM.

So: you don’t want to be a handyman, you dream of crisscrossing Europe, and vacationing for more than 10 days per year makes you antsy.

Still, there’s that voice in the back of your head saying, “We love that place. We have the money. If we don’t buy now, we never will.”

Why not?

Maybe buying a second house isn’t going to improve your Return on Life right now. But retiring to your favorite vacation destination could be an invigorating change of scenery. There’s a big difference between putting off your goals until it’s too late and putting a plan in place that will let you hit that goal when the time is right.

In the meantime, keep that favorite spot in your vacation rotation. Who knows? After a few more years, the shine might wear off and you’ll start dreaming about a new retirement home.

Ready to move but not sure where to go? Check out Money.com for the 8 best cities to retire in.

And as your plans evolve, make sure you keep us in the loop. Wherever you decide to settle down, our planning process can help you get there.