7 Obstacles That Prevent People From Starting Businesses (And How To Overcome Them)

Millions of people dream of becoming entrepreneurs, but they never take that all-important first step. Too many things get in the way of their pursuit of business ownership, or they keep convincing themselves that their dream isn’t realistic. 

If you ever want to move past this phase and found your own business, you need to acknowledge the specific obstacles that are holding you back and work to resolve them. Here are seven of the most common challenges that may be standing between you and your entrepreneurial dreams—and ways you can kick them to the curb. 

1. Financial limitations

Launching a business takes money, and most people don’t have ample cash to throw at a startup. There are several options here. First off, you could begin saving now for the funds to establish your business. If you shop for a better mortgage and reduce your house payments by refinancing, you can sock the savings away in your startup fund. You can trim costs in other areas to put away a few hundred dollars each month or save even more by picking up a side gig.

Barring that, you can secure funding in a variety of ways, such as borrowing from friends and family, crowdfunding, seeking loans and grants or even working with angel investors and venture capitalists. There’s always a way forward. 

2. Inexperience

Becoming a successful entrepreneur typically demands experience; you need to understand your industry and business management in general if you want to earn a living from your venture. When you have limited experience, you may be reluctant to move forward, and understandably so.

You can make up for this, however, by actively seeking the experience you lack. Take an online course to gain a grasp of business management basics. Strive for a leadership position with your current employer so you’ll acquire strategic planning and people management skills. Work with a mentor or shadow an entrepreneur you admire. 

3. No standout idea

You can’t build a business if you don’t have a promising idea for a product or service you can sell. Without a solid business plan, you won’t be able to convince investors or partners to join you—and you won’t even know where to begin. Unfortunately, this is one of the least “fudgeable” obstacles on this list. Without a good idea, you can’t start a business, period.

Luckily, there are ways to stimulate better idea generation, such as talking to a broad range of people, reading entrepreneurial content and taking a more robust approach to brainstorming. Techniques like mind mapping and word banking can get your creative juices flowing. 

4. Current responsibilities

Some people avoid starting a business because of existing responsibilities or constraints on their time. Their current full-time job, their status as a parent or other personal responsibilities hold them back from their entrepreneurial ambitions.

Here the best approach is to determine how much of an impact these responsibilities have and consider ways to delegate or remove them. Could you realistically quit your day job, for example, or hire someone to help with household duties or childcare?  

5. Fear of failure

Lack of confidence is an entrepreneurship killer. It’s true that the failure rate for new businesses is relatively high, with half of new companies failing within five years. To buck those odds, you’ll need a healthy dose of confidence in yourself and your idea. 

The only solution to a fear of failure is to change your mindset. You have to see failure as an opportunity for learning and growth and stop seeing it as the end of the road, an indictment of your abilities or a stain on your character. Reading accounts by successful entrepreneurs will inspire you to see the possibilities rather than focusing only on the risks.  

6. Aversion to stress or hard work

Starting and running a business demands a lot of effort. You’ll likely be putting in long hours and dealing with stressful issues. On top of that, your first few years are apt to be highly inconsistent, with your business only making a profit some of the time. This can wreak havoc on your finances and peace of mind. If you’re not feeling up to this kind of pressure, or if you’re loath to work more than 40 hours a week, entrepreneurship may not be for you.

Again, the only way around this obstacle is to change your attitude. Remember that all this hard work will be in service to yourself, not an employer. While the risks are on you, so are the rewards.

7. Poor timing

One of the most common excuses you’ll hear (or hear yourself saying) is that it’s “just not the right time” to start a business. The truth is, there’s never a truly “right” time—you can always find some reason that today, or this month or this year isn’t ideal for launching your venture. 

But like beginning a diet on a Wednesday or joining a gym in February, the trick is to make your own right time. Microsoft was born during the oil crisis of the 1970s, while Airbnb and Uber were founded in the depths of the Great Recession. Remind yourself that the success of your business will depend not on “the times” but on you.

The Realities of Entrepreneurship

It’s true that anyone can become an entrepreneur with enough grit and persistence. Most entrepreneurs with solid ideas have a good chance of becoming successful if they remain adaptable. But it’s also important to realize that not everyone is cut out for entrepreneurship

If you’re intimidated by the stress, inconsistency and long hours associated with startup life, or if you truly love your day job and you’re afraid to leave, maybe business ownership isn’t right for you. That said, if you feel the pull of entrepreneurship but keep making excuses to avoid getting started, you owe it to yourself to challenge those excuses and try to move past them.

This article was written by Serenity Gibbons and published on Forbes.com.

Billionaire Financier David Rubenstein On Leadership Lessons From Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Oprah And More

Wall Street firms famously love to hire renowned CEOs, ex-presidents, retired generals and famous coaches to give inspirational talks to senior management and rank-and-file employees. As a philanthropist and the co-founder of The Carlyle Group—one of the world’s largest private equity firms with $221 billion in assets under management, David Rubenstein has attended his share of these events only to find some of the speakers “not the most scintillating.”  

“I kind of came up with the idea; maybe I could make it a little livelier if I interviewed them. Just thinking I could add in some humor,” Rubenstein tells Forbes of the inspiration for his latest book How To Lead: Wisdom from the World’s Greatest CEOs, Founders, and Game Changers

Based on dozens of interviews he has conducted with chief executives, politicians, thought leaders and industry trailblazers in the past five years, Rubenstein wants readers to see the full spectrum of assets and liabilities in leaders, including Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, former U.S. Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, and Oprah, who inspired Rubenstein to be a better listener. “Hopefully, you’ll have better leadership out of all this,” he says, aiming to inspire younger generations to be leaders themselves.

JPMORGAN CHASE DIMON
Money Business: Rubenstein interviewed JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon in April 2019. PHOTOGRAPHER: MARK KAUZLARICH/BLOOMBERG

“I’m getting up there in years and what is going to be one of the legacies I can leave to people and my children? Maybe I can have a couple of books,” says the private equity billionaire, who published his first collection of interviews, The American Story, last year. An insatiable reader who reads “six newspapers a day, at least a dozen weekly periodicals, and at least one book a week,” Rubenstein believes that a lifetime of curiosity is essential for a good leader.  

For those hoping to fast-track their way to the top, there is no shortcut to becoming a leader, Rubenstein says. Reflecting on his 2017 interview with Nike cofounder Phil Knight, he writes that Knight’s original vision to start an athletic shoe company was hardly the only factor in his success. It was also Knight’s willingness “to put in the long hours—and to suffer the occasional failures and crises—to make this vision a reality, and in recent years to turn the operation over to experienced managers who could further build the company.”

In addition to the interviews, Rubenstein also lists twelve pillars for being a good leader: luck, desire to succeed, pursuit of uniqueness, hard work, focus, persistence, persuasion, humility, credit-sharing, ability to keep learning, integrity, and failure. (Rubenstein, who is worth $3.2 billion, admits that his biggest business mistake was selling Carlyle’s $80 million investment in Amazon shortly after its IPO in 1996. He says that stake would now be worth about $4 billion.). 

Finances aside, 2020 has been a devastating year for billions around the world who have turned to leaders—in politics, business, sports, and entertainment—for clarity and hope. Rubenstein believes those who understand humility and rise to the occasion will be the ones remembered for their actions, such as late congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. 

“Tony Fauci is in a league by himself,” Rubenstein says. “He’s been swatted down by lots of people, and some people criticize him for lots of reasons, but he’s stayed in the arena and he’s fought for what he believes are really, really good principles.”

David Rubenstein How to Lead
SIMON & SCHUSTER

Another leader who has had to step up in 2020 and was interviewed by Rubenstein last year is NBA commissioner Adam Silver. “Who would not be upset when people are getting shot in the back or are killed for no reason that seems apparent to anybody?” Rubenstein says of the league-wide strike following the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin. “I think the world has recognized that you can’t ignore the protests of players just because they’re athletes. Now, everybody realizes it’s probably a mistake to do what [the NFL] did in terms of not letting [Colin Kaepernick] come play again.”

One name that didn’t make the cut for Rubenstein’s new collection is Donald Trump. “I did interview President Trump before he was the president at the Economic Club of Washington, and that’s where he told me he was going to run for president,” says Rubenstein who thought the interview was too dated to be included in the book. “I was surprised. I didn’t really believe he was going to do it. And I didn’t think he could pull it off. He did.” 

Unlike Trump, the Washington, D.C-based Rubenstein doesn’t imagine himself in the political arena anytime soon. “I’m still a youngster by the standards for people running for president so maybe I’m a little bit too young to run right now,” the 71-year-old investor says. (Trump is 74 years old and Biden is 77.) “But to be very serious, I think there are a lot of people who are probably younger, and probably would do a better job than I would do.” Hopeful about the near future, he says the country will have a fresh start in 2021 following a Covid-19 vaccine and the elections. 

Recalling a recent conversation he had with Shark Tank judge and billionaire Mark Cuban, Rubenstein says he expects people are going to create great companies post Covid-19—those who prioritize diversity and inclusion, philanthropy, and social impact as well as profits. “If you’re ever thinking of doing something entrepreneurial,” Rubenstein says, “do it sooner rather than later.”

This article was written by Deniz Cam for Forbes.com

Apple Becomes First U.S. Company Worth More Than $2 Trillion

Apple hit a new milestone on Wednesday, becoming the first publicly traded U.S. company to reach a market capitalization of over $2 trillion and doubling in valuation over the last two years.

KEY FACTS

The iPhone maker’s stock is up almost 55% so far in 2020, and shares have rallied more than 106% since the market hit a low point amid the coronavirus recession on March 23 (compared to the benchmark S&P 500’s gain of 51% over that period).

Now trading at nearly $470 per share, Apple’s stock is at an all-time high, and Wall Street analysts are still quite bullish that it can continue to rally: 61% give it a “buy” rating and 27% a “hold” rating, according to Bloomberg data.

Apple’s market cap now eclipses that of other U.S. tech giants, including Microsoft ($1.7 trillion), Amazon ($1.6 trillion), Google parent Alphabet ($1.1 trillion) and Facebook ($761 billion).

Apple was also the first U.S. company to reach a $1 trillion market cap, which it did just over two years ago, on August 2, 2018.

On July 31, 2020, after reporting strong third-quarter earnings, Apple surpassed Saudi state oil giant Aramco to become the world’s most valuable publicly traded company.

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While Saudi Aramco surpassed a $2 trillion valuation in December 2019, plunging oil prices amid the coronavirus pandemic have since hurt its stock.

SURPRISING FACT

At $2 trillion, Apple’s market value is now higher than the GDP of numerous developed countries, including Italy, Brazil, Canada, Russia and South Korea, to name a few.

WHAT TO WATCH FOR

Apple shares are about to get more affordable for investors, too. The company will finalize its four-for-one stock split at the end of August, which means a single share will be worth around $117. While the value of the company will remain the same, there will now be more shares available trading at lower prices.

KEY BACKGROUND

Apple has thrived during the pandemic, as many people were forced to stay at home. The company has benefited from work-from-home trends and strong online sales; It posted record third-quarter earnings in late July, with nearly $60 billion in revenue, not to mention double-digit growth in its products and services segments.

This article was written by Sergei Klebnikov for Forbes.com

Uber is reportedly in talks to buy food delivery firm Postmates for $2.6 billion

Uber is changing tack after acquisition talks with Grubhub fell through by switching its attention to food delivery startup Postmates, the New York Times reports.

Three sources familiar with the matter told the Times that Uber and Postmates were holding ongoing acquisition talks. One of the sources said Uber is offering to buy Postmates for roughly $2.6 billion.

Uber was reportedly in acquisition talks with food delivery startup Grubhub earlier this year, but Grubhub announced on June 11 it was instead merging with European takeaway service Just Eat. Sources told CNBC Uber walked away from the deal over concerns it would attract antitrust scrutiny.

As a much smaller player in the food delivery business, Postmates could be a safer option.

According to analytics firm Second Measure, Postmates makes up a significantly smaller chunk of the US market than Grubhub. Grubhub captured 32% of food delivery sales in 2019, while Postmates made up 10%. Uber Eats meanwhile accounted for 20% of the market.

Antitrust fears are not the only possible reason why Uber may have walked away from Grubhub, various reports emerged that the two firms struggled to agree on a price for the acquisition. Just Eat paid roughly $7.3 billion to acquire the startup.

Uber’s desire to bolster its food delivery service has reportedly been spurred on by the coronavirus pandemic, as demand for taxi services has plummeted while food delivery has skyrocketed.

Two sources told the Times Postmates has also held sale talks with Grubhub and DoorDash over the past year.

Postmates confidentially filed plans for an IPO with the SEC in February 2019, but has yet to go public. Sources told Reuters on Monday that the company is considering reviving its IPO plans due to the boom in food delivery brought on by the pandemic.

Uber and Postmates were not immediately available to comment when contacted by Business Insider.

This article was written on BusinessInsider.com by Isobel Asher Hamilton

Dwyane Wade Was One of the Greatest Leaders the NBA Has Ever Seen. Here’s What Made Him So Special


Dwyane Wade is so much more than basketball. And leaders should strive to be so much more than business.

Once in a great while, an athlete comes along who performs incredible in-sport feats, all of which pale in comparison to the kind of man or woman they are outside the sport. On Wednesday night, that elite group slipped a member’s jacket over the shoulders of Dwyane Wade.

That’s when Wade played his last NBA game, suiting up for the Miami Heat, who narrowly missed making the playoffs. The Heat lost to the Brooklyn Nets 113-94 but Wade managed 25 points, 11 rebounds, and 10 assists–the coveted triple-double.

The class act gave his final act in front of opposing but adoring fans who gave him repeated standing ovations. Also in attendance were friends LeBron James, Chris Paul, and Carmelo Anthony–an indication of just how respected Wade is.

After the game Wade thanked all the people who helped him along the way–one classy final assist.

You could be dazzled by Wade’s on-court accomplishments: three NBA championships, 12 consecutive all-star appearances, the 2006 finals MVP, and his 2009 scoring title. But Wade’s greatest skill isn’t his basketball prowess. It’s his in-all-ways impressive emotional intelligence. A skill he wields as a leader that every leader should strive to emulate.

In 2011, Wade’s Heat unexpectedly lost in the NBA finals to the Dallas Mavericks. Throughout the season, superstar teammates Wade and LeBron James showed friction that needed mending.ADVERTISING

After that finals loss, their families took a vacation together to the Bahamas. Wade recently told Sports Illustrated that the 2011 season made him realize LeBron was better than he was. It made him want to better himself–off the court. He made his move to do so during that family vacation. As he told SI:

I knew that LeBron could go to a level that I couldn’t go to. And I wanted to take a little bit of that ‘looking over his shoulder’ mentality away. So I said, go ahead bro,’ be your great self and we will all figure out how to be great around you.

Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra said this of the gesture:

How many guys are willing to do that? He’s emotionally stable and has an incredible emotional intelligence. That’s when our team really took off, when LeBron was able to be the best player on the galaxy. Dwyane kicked that off.

Wade’s astonishing EQ was celebrated on Tuesday in a now-viral Budweiser ad that honors Wade for being “so much more than basketball.” Watch for yourself, but be warned, your defenses are useless. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a basketball fan or not: You will need a tissue.

The video lauds Wade for honoring Joaquin Oliver–a Parkland shooting victim who idolized Wade–by writing his name on his sneaker. For taking a family on a shopping spree after their house burned down. For paying full college tuition for a girl whose family couldn’t afford it. For giving words of encouragement to a young man who hailed from a place where people don’t fare well. For supporting his wayward mother through a prison sentence, and buying her a church thereafter.

Wade, as one of the people in the video points out, simply cares.

Of the commercial, Wade said last night on NBA TV, “The people in the commercial reminded me of why I try to be more than basketball.”

Dwyane Wade is so much more than basketball. The best leaders are so much more than business.

That’s the core of emotional intelligence. You either care or you don’t. There’s no gray zone. What’s trickier is whether or not you show it. Intent is the false idol of many a leader.

The single biggest thread connecting all the best, most memorable leaders for whom I’ve ever worked was their effortless way of showing they cared. They didn’t have to work hard to care. They just did. It can be that way for you too–it’s a choice, a matter of prioritization.

Here’s a simple trick you can employ for those harried days when it’s easy to forget that the troops want to know you care about them. Remember the number 29. Is that a new status symbol–29 is the new 30? The legal drinking age in Bulgaria? 

No–it’s a percentage, as in only 29 percent of 1,000 employees I surveyed said they felt their boss genuinely cared about them. Or maybe the inversion of that number, 71, is a better prompt for you, as in 71 percent believe their boss doesn’t genuinely care about them. This is one number you don’t want to hit as a leader.

One thing I can say with great pride about my own leadership is that I’ve never seen myself as “in business,” despite being in business for 30 years. I’ve always been in the people business. And business was always good, which meant–not coincidentally–that business was always good.

Dwyane Wade is now retired. His number will be retired too, soon enough. But his role-model ability to care–those are shoes he’ll never hang up.

Nor should you. And if you haven’t laced yours up yet as a leader–game on.

This article was written by Scott Mautz for Inc.com

Stop Whining About Your Tech Stocks

picture of a little boy whining on a poster that says stop whining

Happy Monday everybody I hope your week is off to a great start. With Monday comes the start of another week, and a chance to hop back into the money making markets. To bring you up to speed, we are seeing some of the big tech names sell off today, which is a continuation of the trend we saw emerge last week. This is causing many investors to freak out and call for the beginning of the next market crash…….like they do every other time the market does anything but go up. Personally, I sit back and laugh at all these market forecasters because they truly have no idea like the rest of us. But nonetheless it’s used as creative click bait to drive views on their websites. So what should one do? Well, if you have a long term time horizon like me the only thing you should even consider doing (aside from doing nothing) is to considering buying more stock of the companies you own. This pullback will be a great buying opportunity as it has been every other time in the past. Are technology companies trading at a premium? Yes. Does that mean they cant continue to improve operational efficiently and trend higher? No.

Moral of the story, stop whining about your tech stocks being down. You had no problem riding them up to record highs, so toughen up and allow for some volatility.

-MD